Web design, then and now

As most of you interested in web design have no doubt noticed A List Apart 4.0 went live yesterday.

As most of you interested in web design have no doubt noticed A List Apart 4.0 went live yesterday. In the look back, Zeldman mentions how A List Apart got started as a mailing list, back in 1997. To really appreciate what a long way the web has come since then – and in some ways still wrestles with the same problems – you should take a look at the following article: The Web Is Ruined
and I ruined it
which was published in 1997 as well. If not for the historical value, the entertainment value alone is reason enough.

Browser wars, the brand new 4.0 versions ;), blink-tags, promising brand new stuff like PNG, Flash and XML, from “HTML Terrorists” to “the light at the end of the tunnel” called stylesheets – there’s really too many things to find a single quote that stands out. You’ll have to read it all I’m afraid – and I doubt you’ll regret it.

By: | Tags: Geekry | Comments: 4

Comments

  1. “The tag denotes a paragraph (originally, HTML required a closing p-tag, , but most browsers ignored it, so it fell out of use).”

    …Oh my Lord!

  2. Hans, I don’t think it’s that backwards. I think browser creators were trying influence how useable the syntax could be by ignoring it. Look at Textile. There are essentially no opening or closing tags.

    Or am I missing the point?

  3. I don’t think it’s that backwards.

    If we would act like XML and XHTML never happened, you might have a point. Also note that Textile is a lot more ambiguous, especially with regard to edge-cases, and more cpu-intensive. And in the end, even with textile you have opening and closing tags to generate a p (though they look very different, opening is p. (dot).

  4. “In a perfectly tagged world” – I can’t begin to describe the visual there!

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